Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Josh Ernest
White House Deputy Press Secretary
CNNW 08/19/2013
(At White House Briefing) Yellin: can you state with authority that the US government has not obtained material from the laptop that British authorities confiscated from Glenn Greenwald's partner or from any of his personal devices they also confiscated. Earnest: I'm just not in a position to talk to you about the conversations between British law enforcement officials and American law enforcement officials. Yellin: so you can't rule out that the US has obtained this material? Earnest: I’m not in the position to do that right now, no. Yellin: Was the White House consulted
Josh Ernest
White House Deputy Press Secretary
CNNW 08/19/2013
Yellin continued: or given a heads up in advance? Earnest: There was a coNSA, there was a heads up that was provided by the British government. Again, this is something that we had an indication was likely to occur but it's not something that we've requested. Yellin: now, briana, numerous follow ups questions, the white house clarified --that they essentially were notified by the British government once Miranda's name appeared on a list that he was flying on an airline and that the Brits planned
Jessica Yellin
Chief White House Correspondent for CNN
CNNW 08/19/2013
Yellin continued: to detain him. The US government was told by the British. We haven't been told who in the US government was told and whether it was directly a call to the White House but clearly they knew in advance. Keilar: and Jessica, it’s pretty interesting because the US here not condemning this action, as you mentioned, very careful not to do that. I think it makes a lot of people wonder could this kind of thing happen here? Do you have any sense to the answer to that question? Yellin: good question.
Jessica Yellin
Chief White House Correspondent for CNN
CNNW 08/19/2013
Yellin: And the answer is yes. The US can do something similar at US airports and boarders. Government officials can check bags, as we all know. Can ask people to turn on their laptops and can even take them and confiscate them ton for a period of time. Our rules require that our government officials return that after a certain number of days or weeks. Now that all depends on what they find on those laptops or devices. If they find something suspicious, of course they could keep them indefinitly and call them evidence. Bottom line is one former official for the DHS, we never have less personal freedom than when you're crossing an international border. Keilar: Interesting. So it could happen here.
Jessica Yellin
Chief White House Correspondent for CNN
CNNW 08/19/2013
Yellin continued: indefinitely and call them evidence. Bottom line is, one former official for the DHS tells me we never have less personal freedom than when you’re crossing an international border, Bianna Keilar: Interesting so it could happen here.
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